WND Columnist Calls for 'Immediate' Quarantine of all HIV-Positive People; Compares Being Gay to Smoking (Americans Against the Tea Party)

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  • April 3, 2015
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Ah, WhirledNutDaily. It’s the place where Internet conspiracies go to read about what their crazy relatives are doing this week; home to rampant bigotry, Chuck Norris, and occasionally Ted Nugent. It’s a smorgasbord of right-wing crazy; a rare look into the right-wing mind, unfiltered.
Giving us our look at the abyss this week is Lord Christopher Monckton, who wrote last Monday that people with HIV/AIDs should be quarantined.
It’s always amusing when right-wingers try to tell liberals what to think; it’s almost like they think they understand liberal talking points, but alas, the best they can do is a straw-stuffed version of them. And that’s the best way to describe this piece by Monckton: there’s so much straw here it’s a fire hazard.
Right Wing Watch notes Monckton kicks things off by writing that liberals, in order to be consistent with their support for public health efforts, should run campaigns that highlight ‘the misery, disease and death that homosexuality – no less than smoking – brings to its unfortunate practitioners’ and to people who are ‘drawn into the homosexual deathstyle.’ ”
Monckton then calls liberals hypocrites for speaking about the dangers of smoking and climate change while trying to “promote ‘gay’ marriage.”
I’d like to know what he thinks gay people do that straight people don’t. To be incredibly prosaic, gays are not a separate species, and they come with the same holes as straight people, which straight people often use in the same manner.
And that’s before we note that lesbians have a lower risk of contracting HIV than straight couples do.
He continues:

Life expectancy for gay and bisexual men is eight to 20 years less than for all men. If the same pattern of mortality were to continue, it is estimated that nearly half of gay and bisexual men now aged 20 will not reach their 65th birthday.
Now, we can always hope that the development of anti-retroviral drugs has helped since 18 years ago. However, the life expectancy of a smoker is 10 years shorter than that of a non-smoker, which – even assuming a dramatic improvement in homosexual lifespans since the 1990s – makes promiscuous homosexuality no less dangerous to the health of those who practice it than smoking.

He’s citing a paper written by Paul Cameron for the Family Research Institute in 1994. Not only is that source so biased it could’ve come from Saudi Arabia, it’s also old enough to legally drink.
I’ll go back, again, to the fact that you can have safe sex with a person, but not a cigarette. There are ways to avoid contracting HIV during sex. There aren’t too many ways to go about avoiding cancer, lung disease, heart disease, and other health problems by smoking.
Monckton goes so far as to call for the “immediate, compulsory, permanent isolation” of people with HIV.

What conclusion should be drawn? It is surely this: Public policy on questions from homosexuality to climate change – where the left is similarly cavalier with the facts (just read any statement from Mr. Obama about the climate) – should be determined on the basis of fact as well as fashion and sentiment.
The Church’s continuous teaching on homosexuality is not some outmoded, fuddy-duddy, far-right, redneck hate-crime. It is born of love for those who might otherwise be drawn into the homosexual deathstyle. It is intended to prevent the misery, disease and death that homosexuality – no less than smoking – brings to its unfortunate practitioners.
Thirty years ago, I pointed out in the American Spectator that in the absence of the usual public-health measure to contain a new and fatal infection – immediate, compulsory, permanent isolation of carriers – millions would die of HIV. I also pointed out that Western sensibilities would not permit the identification and isolation of carriers.

Thirty years ago, he was wrong.
Thirty years later, he’s still wrong. Unlike medical statistics, that’s one thing that doesn’t change over time.
[ h/t RWW]